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16.2 Properties Reference

AcceptTypes

stringArray = Request.AcceptTypes

Returns a string array containing the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extension (MIME) types accepted by the client. You can use this property to determine whether a client can accept certain response types, including application types such as Word or Excel, which are supported only by Internet Explorer.

The following table lists some common MIME types:

MIME type

Description

text/html

HTML text content

text/xml

XML text content

image/gif

GIF-encoded image data

image/jpg

JPEG-encoded image data

application/msword

Binary data for Microsoft Word

Parameter

stringArray

A string array that receives the array of accept types from the property.

Example

The code example declares a string array and an integer counter variable and assigns the AcceptTypes property value to the array variable. It then iterates the array members using the counter variable, writing each value to the browser by using the Message label control:

Sub Page_Load( )
   'Display Accept Types
   Dim MyArray( ) As String
   Dim I As Integer 
   MyArray = Request.AcceptTypes
   For I = 0 To MyArray.GetUpperBound(0)
      Message.Text &= "Type " & CStr(I) & ": " & CStr(MyArray(I)) & _     
              "<br/>"
   Next I
End Sub

The output of the code would look something like this:

Type 0: image/gif
Type 1: image/x-xbitmap
Type 2: image/jpeg
Type 3: image/pjpeg
Type 4: application/vnd.ms-powerpoint
Type 5: application/vnd.ms-excel
Type 6: application/msword
Type 7: */*

Notes

This property can prevent the server from wasting time sending responses to the client that the client cannot handle. For example, a request that would normally be fulfilled by returning an Excel spreadsheet could be fulfilled with an alternate response type for clients that do not support the Excel MIME type, application/vnd.ms-excel.

ApplicationPath

stringvar = Request.ApplicationPath

Returns a string containing the path to the virtual root of the current application.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the value of the ApplicationPath property.

Example

The code example retrieves the ApplicationPath and writes it to the client using the Message label control:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Message.Text = Request.ApplicationPath
End Sub

The output of the code should be the name of the virtual root of the application to which the request was sent.

Browser

bc = Request.Browser

Returns an instance of the HttpBrowserCapabilities class that describes the capabilities of the client browser. You can then use the class instance to determine what capabilities the client browser supports. The HttpBrowserCapabilities class exposes the capabilities of the client browser as a set of Boolean and String properties. Properties of the HttpBrowserCapabilities class include:

ActiveXControls

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports ActiveX controls.

AOL

A Boolean indicating whether the browser is an AOL browser.

BackgroundSounds

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports background sounds.

Beta

A Boolean indicating whether the browser is beta software.

Browser

A String containing the User-Agent header value.

CDF

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports the Channel Definition Format for pushing content.

ClrVersion

Returns a System.Version object containing version information about the CLR (if any) installed on the client machine (from the User-Agent header). If ClrVersion is not Nothing, you can retrieve version information from four of its Integer properties: Major, Minor, Revision, and Build.

Cookies

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports cookies.

Crawler

A Boolean indicating whether the browser is a search engine web crawler.

EcmaScriptVersion

Returns an instance of the Version class containing information about the version of ECMAScript supported by the client browser. If EcmaScriptVersion is not Nothing, you can retrieve version information from four of its Integer properties: Major, Minor, Revision, and Build.

Frames

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports frames.

Item

A Dictionary interface to values (i.e., Request.Browser.Item(keyname)).

JavaApplets

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports Java applets.

JavaScript

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports JavaScript.

MajorVersion

An Integer representing the browser major version number (for example, for IE 3.01, the MajorVersion property would return 3).

MinorVersion

A Double representing the browser minor version number (for example, for IE 3.01, the MinorVersion property would return .01).

MSDomVersion

Returns an instance of the Version class containing information about the version of the Microsoft XML Document Object Model (DOM) supported by the client browser. If MSDomVersion is not Nothing, you can retrieve version information from four of its Integer properties: Major, Minor, Revision, and Build.

Platform

A String containing the platform name (if any) included in the User-Agent header.

Tables

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports HTML tables.

Type

A String containing the name and major version of the client browser.

VBScript

A Boolean indicating whether the browser supports VBScript.

Version

A String containing both the major and minor version numbers of the client browser.

W3CDomVersion

Returns an instance of the Version class containing information about the version of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) XML DOM supported by the client browser. If W3CDomVersion is not Nothing, you can retrieve version information from four of its Integer properties: Major, Minor, Revision, and Build.

Win16

A Boolean indicating whether the client is a Win16 machine.

Win32

A Boolean indicating whether the client is a Win32 machine.

Parameter

bc

An Object variable of type HttpBrowserCapabilities.

Example

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim bc As HttpBrowserCapabilities
   bc = Request.Browser
   If bc.Cookies Then
      Message.Text = "Cookies are available with this browser"
   Else
      Message.Text = "Cookies are not available with this browser"
   End If
End Sub

Notes

You will probably use this property a lot if you plan to support multiple browsers and must provide the highest level of functionality on uplevel browsers such as Internet Explorer 5 or 6 or Netscape 6. For some properties, such as Cookies and JavaScript, the returned Boolean indicates only whether the browser version sending the request supports these features, not whether they are currently enabled in the current user's browser.

This property is especially important when developing custom server controls, since it allows you to have your custom controls automatically tailor their output to a specific browser (or class of browsers). See Chapter 6 for more information on custom control development.

ClientCertificate

cs = Request.ClientCertificate

Returns an instance of the HttpClientCertificate class, which exposes information about the client security certificate settings. These properties include issuer information, key size, and certificate validity dates.

Parameter

cs

An Object variable of type HttpClientCertificate.

Example

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim cs As HttpClientCertificate
   cs = Request.ClientCertificate
   Message.Text = "Certificate Issuer is: " & cs.Issuer & "."
End Sub

Notes

You will probably use this property in intranet settings, where you have provided a limited set of clients with certificates (issued from your own Certificate Server) for accessing your application, rather than requiring them to authenticate by using a set of credentials entered via the browser. In this case, client certificates are mapped to NT user accounts to provide secure access. Client certificates can also be issued by trusted third parties, but this method is rarely used. If no client certificate is installed on the requesting client, this property returns an HttpClientCertificate instance with no valid property values.

ContentEncoding

ce = Request.ContentEncoding

Returns an instance of the Encoding class (located in the System.Text namespace), which represents the character encoding of the body of the current request.

Parameter

ce

An Object variable of type Encoding.

Example

The example demonstrates how to display the current ContentEncoding to the user:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim ce As System.Text.Encoding
   ce = Request.ContentEncoding
   Message.Text = "Current encoding is: " & ce.EncodingName & "."
End Sub

For a request using UTF-8 content encoding, the output of this example would be:

Current encoding is: Unicode (UTF-8).
ContentLength

intvar = Request.ContentLength

Returns an integer containing the length, in bytes, of the request sent from the client. This property includes only the content sent in the body of the HTTP request and does not include the length of the HTTP headers or of any data sent as part of an HTTP GET request (which would appear in the headers). If the HTTP request contains no body, its value is 0.

Parameter

intvar

An Integer variable to receive the length, in bytes, of the content.

Example

This example demonstrates how to display the length of the current request in the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim length As Integer
   length = Request.ContentLength
   Message.Text = "Length of request was: " & length & " bytes."
End Sub

The following code can be used to post to the example page:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Submit a named parameter via POST</title>
   </head>
<body>
   <form id="form1" action="ContentLength.aspx" method="POST">
      <h3>Name:</h3>
      <input type="text" name="name">
      <input type="submit">
   </form>
</body>
</html>

Notes

You can use this property to test the length of content posted via a POST request before acting on that content. For example, if your page receives files from a file input field, you could check the ContentLength property before saving or processing the uploaded file to prevent users from uploading files greater than a specific size. Note that in cases when you receive multiple form fields, you can get more specific data on the size of an uploaded file by referring to the Posted-File.ContentLength property of an HtmlInputFile control used for submitting files.

ContentType

stringvar = Request.ContentType

Returns a string containing the MIME type of the current client request. On GET requests, this property may return an empty string.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the content type.

Example

The example shows how you can take different actions in your page, depending on the ContentType of the request:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim ct As String
   ct = Request.ContentType
   If ct = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded" Then
      'Process form input
      Message.Text = "Form data was submitted."
   Else
      Message.Text = "Content Type of request is: " & ct
   End If
End Sub

The following code can be used to post to the example page:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Submit a named parameter via POST</title>
   </head>
<body>
   <form id="form1" action="ContentType.aspx" method="POST">
      <h3>Name:</h3>
      <input type="text" name="name">
      <input type="submit">
   </form>
</body>
</html>

Notes

One potential use for this property is to ensure that the content type of the request is what you expect it to be. This can help avoid wasting processor time with invalid requests and prevent malicious users from attempting to forge requests to your application that send unexpected content.

FilePath

stringvar = Request.FilePath

Returns a string containing the virtual path of the current client request. The virtual path includes the name of the application root folder, any subfolders in the request path, and the requested filename.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the file path.

Example

The example displays the FilePath property to the user:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim fp As String
   fp = Request.FilePath
   Message.Text = "The virtual path of the current request is: _
           & "<strong>" & fp & "</strong>"
End Sub

Notes

This property is identical to the Path property listed later in this chapter.

HttpMethod

stringvar = Request.HttpMethod

Returns a string containing the method (i.e., GET, POST, or HEAD) of the current request.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the HTTP method of the current request.

Example

The example uses the HttpMethod property to determine what action to take for a given request:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Select Case Request.HttpMethod
      Case "POST"
         Response.Write("POST requests not allowed!<br/>")
         Response.End
      Case "HEAD"
         Response.Write("HEAD requests not allowed!<br/>")
         Response.End
      Case "GET"
         'Process request
         Message.Text = "GET requests are allowed!<br/>"
      Case Else
         Response.Write("Unknown request: not allowed!<br/>")
         Response.End      
   End Select
End Sub

Note that we use Response.Write to send the message before calling Response.End. Calling Response.End will immediately terminate procfessing of the page, which will also prevent rendering of any server control output. The code for a page that makes a POST request to the example page is shown here:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Submit a named parameter via POST</title>
   </head>
<body>
   <form id="form1" action="HttpMethod.aspx" method="POST">
      <h3>Name:</h3>
      <input type="text" name="name">
      <input type="submit">
   </form>
</body>
</html>

Notes

In classic ASP, the request method was typically retrieved using the REQUEST_ METHOD key of the ServerVariables collection. Often, this key was used to create self-submitting form pages by displaying a set of form fields when the GET method was detected and processing the input received from the form fields when the POST method was detected. ASP.NET Web Forms provide built-in plumbing for self submitting forms. By adding a form with the runat="server" attribute and adding one or more input type server controls to the form, the developer only needs to check the page's IsPostBack property to determine whether a POST or GET request has been received, and execute the desired code based on that property.

InputStream

inputstream = Request.InputStream

Returns a stream object containing the body of the incoming HTTP request.

Parameter

inputstream

An Object variable of type stream.

Example

The example uses a byte array to search for a specified character and then copies that character and the remaining contents of the stream to a string. The @ Import directive shown in the example should be placed at the top of the page:

<% @ Import Namespace="System.IO" %>
  
Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim InStream As Stream
   Dim iCounter, StreamLength, iRead As Integer
   Dim OutString As String
   Dim Found As Boolean
  
   InStream = Request.InputStream
   StreamLength = CInt(InStream.Length)
   Dim ByteArray(StreamLength) As Byte
   iRead = InStream.Read(ByteArray, 0, StreamLength)
   InStream.Close( )
  
   For iCounter = 0 to StreamLength - 1
      If Found = True Then
         OutString &= Chr(ByteArray(iCounter))
      End If
      If Chr(ByteArray(iCounter)) = "A" Then
         Found = True
         OutString &= Chr(ByteArray(iCounter))
      End If
   Next iCounter
  
   Message.Text = "Output: " & OutString
End Sub

The following code can be used to post to the example page:

<html>
   <head>
   </head>
<body>
   <form id="form1" action="InputStream.aspx" method="POST">
      <h3>Name:</h3>
      <input type="text" name="name">
      <input type="submit">
   </form>
</body>
</html>

The code returns as output the first capital A appearing in the request body. Any characters after it are returned to the end of the stream.

Notes

This property is useful if you wish to perform byte-level filtering of the request body. It works only with POST requests, since these requests are the only commonly used HTTP requests that provide a request body.

IsAuthenticated

boolvar = Request.IsAuthenticated

Returns a Boolean indicating whether the current request is coming from a user who is authenticated. This property refers to authentication against the NTLM account database.

Parameter

boolvar

A Boolean variable to receive the authentication status of the user.

Example

The example checks to see if the current user is authenticated and it outputs one of two messages, depending on the authentication status of the user. Note that the message delivered to authenticated users utilizes the User property of the page to output the current user's name and domain.

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim boolAuth As Boolean
  
   boolAuth = Request.IsAuthenticated
  
   If boolAuth Then
      Message.Text = "User " & Page.User.Identity.Name & " is authenticated."
   Else
      Message.Text = "Current user is not authenticated."
   End If
End Sub

Notes

In addition to the IsAuthenticated property that the HttpRequest class exposes, the FormsIdentity, WindowsIdentity, and PassportIdentity classes expose an IsAuthenticated property for much the same purpose as the HttpRequest class. Note that the IsAuthenticated property of the HttpRequest class returns the authentication status of the user regardless of the authentication method used.

IsSecureConnection

boolvar = Request.IsSecureConnection

Returns a Boolean indicating whether the current connection uses secure sockets (SSL) for communication.

Parameter

boolvar

A Boolean variable to receive the SSL status of the current request.

Example

The example shows how you can take different actions depending on whether or not the current request was made via SSL:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim boolvar As Boolean
   boolvar = Request.IsSecureConnection
   If boolvar = True Then
      Message.Text = "Connection is HTTPS."
   Else
      Message.Text = "Connection is HTTP."
   End If
End Sub

Notes

You would typically use this property to determine whether or not to fulfill a request that requires an SSL connection in order to encrypt sensitive data (such as credit card numbers) that might be submitted via the requested page. Additionally, you could use this property on a page that may or may not use SSL to determine how to render output to the page depending on the SSL status. Since encrypting and decrypting content for SSL communication exacts a performance penalty, reducing the number and/or size of graphics used on SSL-enabled pages is generally considered good practice. With this property, you could render more and/or higher-resolution graphics when SSL is not enabled for the request, and render fewer and/or lower-resolution graphics for SSL requests.

Path

stringvar = Request.Path

Returns a string containing the virtual path of the current client request. The virtual path includes the name of the application root folder, subfolders in the request path, and the requested filename.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the file path.

Example

The example displays the Path property to the user:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim path As String
   path = Request.FilePath
   Message.Text = "The virtual path of the current request is: " & path
End Sub

Notes

This property is identical to the FilePath property listed earlier in this chapter.

PathInfo

stringvar = Request.PathInfo

Returns a string containing any additional path information (including path information appended to a URL after the filename of the requested resource) passed with the current request.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the additional path information.

Example

The example writes both the Path and PathInfo properties to the client browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Message.Text = "Path = " & Request.Path & "<br/>"
   Message.Text &= "Additional Path Info = " & Request.PathInfo & "<br/>"
End Sub

Notes

PathInfo does not return information such as query string values. PathInfo returns any characters following a forward-slash (/) after the resource (file) name, including the forward-slash itself.

PhysicalApplicationPath

stringvar = Request.PhysicalApplicationPath

Returns a string containing the physical path to the root of the current application.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the application path.

Example

The example writes the PhysicalApplicationPath property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim physAppPath As String
   physAppPath = Request.PhysicalApplicationPath
   Message.Text = "Physical Application Path = " & physAppPath
End Sub

Notes

This property is useful when you need to create or write to a file within your web application. Rather than hardcoding a filesystem path in your page, you can use this property in combination with a filename to create or edit a file in the same folder as the page containing the code, regardless of the page's location.

PhysicalPath

stringvar = Request.PhysicalPath

Returns a string containing the physical path to the requested file.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the physical path.

Example

The example writes the PhysicalPath property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim physicalPath As String
   physicalPath = Request.PhysicalPath
   Message.Text = "Physical Path = " & physicalPath
End Sub

Notes

Unlike the PhysicalApplicationPath, which returns only the path to the root of the application, the PhysicalPath property returns the full physical path of the requested resource, including any intervening folders and the resource's filename. This property may be useful in combination with ASP.NET's Trace functionality in troubleshooting situations when files you are attempting to write to or read from are not found, or when created files aren't located where you expect them to be. Adding Trace.Write statements to your page to write the Path, PhysicalApplicationPath, and PhysicalPath properties to the trace log (which you can enable by adding the Trace="true" attribute to the @ Page directive) may help you track down such bugs.

RawUrl

stringvar = Request.RawUrl

Returns a string containing the raw URL of the current request. The raw URL consists of the portion of the URL following the domain information. Thus, for the URL http://search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp, the raw URL is /kb/c.asp. The raw URL includes the query string, if one is present.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the raw URL.

Example

The example writes the RawUrl property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim stringvar As String
   stringvar = Request.RawUrl
   Message.Text = "The raw URL is: " & stringvar
End Sub
RequestType

stringvar = Request.RequestType

The RequestType property returns a String containing the request type (i.e., GET or POST) of the current request.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the request type.

Example

The example writes the RequestType property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim stringvar As String
   stringvar = Request.RequestType
   Message.Text = "The request type is: " & stringvar
End Sub

Notes

This property is listed as read/write; however, there really aren't any situations where it would be useful to change its value. From the read standpoint, this property returns the same information as the read-only HttpMethod property listed earlier in this chapter. If you attempt to change its value, no corresponding change occurs in the value of HttpMethod.

TotalBytes

intvar = Request.TotalBytes

Returns an Integer representing the size of the HTTP request body. The TotalBytes property does not include the size of the HTTP request headers, or the size of query string values passed with a GET request.

Parameter

intvar

An Integer variable to receive the size, in bytes, of the current request body.

Example

The example writes the TotalBytes property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim intvar As Integer
   intvar = Request.TotalBytes
   Message.Text = "The size of the current request body is: <br/>"
   Message.Text &= intvar & " bytes."
End Sub

The following code can be used to post to the example page:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Submit a named parameter via POST</title>
   </head>
<body>
   <form id="form1" action="TotalBytes.aspx" method="POST">
      <h3>Name:</h3>
      <input type="text" name="name">
      <input type="submit">
   </form>
</body>
</html>

Notes

This property's behavior is identical to that of the ContentLength property described earlier in this chapter.

Url

uriObj = Request.Url

Returns an instance of the Uri class containing properties that describe the current URL requested by the user. Properties exposed by the Uri class include Scheme (protocol), Port, and Host.

Parameter

uriObj

An Object variable of type Uri.

Example

The example uses the Uri object that the Url property returns to write information about the URL for the current request to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim myUri As Uri
   myUri = Request.Url
  
   Message.Text = "Current request URL info - <br/><br/>"
   Message.Text &= "Protocol: " & myUri.Scheme & "<br/>"
   Message.Text &= "Port: " & myUri.Port & "<br/>"
   Message.Text &= "Host Name: " & myUri.Host & "<br/>"
End Sub

Notes

While the Uri class this property returns has methods as well as properties, you're more likely to use these methods (particularly the CheckHostName and CheckSchemeName methods) when creating your own Uri resource from scratch, rather than when receiving the Uri instance from the Url property.

A note on URIs: Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) (compare to Uniform Resource Locator, or URL) is a more general version of URLs and URNs. In most cases today, URI and URL are identical, although this may change as URNs are used more frequently. For the purposes of the Url property, the terms carry the same meaning.

UrlReferrer

uriObj = Request.UrlReferrer

Returns an instance of the Uri class containing properties that describe the URL for the resource from which the user navigated to the current requested resource. If the user did not navigate to the current resource (i.e., if the current resource is accessed directly), the UrlReferrer property returns Nothing.

Parameter

uriObj

An Object variable of type Uri.

Example

The example uses the Uri object that the UrlReferrer property returned in order to write information about the URL for the referring resource to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim myUri As Uri
   myUri = Request.UrlReferrer
  
   If Not (myUri Is Nothing) Then
      Message.Text = "Referral URL info - <br/><br/>"
      Message.Text &= "Protocol: " & myUri.Scheme & "<br/>"
      Message.Text &= "Port: " & myUri.Port & "<br/>"
      Message.Text &= "Host Name: " & myUri.Host & "<br/>"
      Message.Text &= "App Path: " & myUri.AbsolutePath & "<br/>"
   Else
      Message.Text = "No referral URL info available."
   End If
End Sub

The following code can link to the example page:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Link to UrlReferrer</title>
   </head>
<body>
   <a href="UrlReferrer.aspx">Go to UrlReferrer.aspx</a>
</body>
</html>

Notes

The example code makes sure that the UrlReferrer property returns a valid instance of the Uri class. The UrlReferrer property returns Nothing if the page is accessed directly rather than from a link on another page.

UserAgent

stringvar = Request.UserAgent

Returns a string containing the User-Agent header. The User-Agent string identifies the browser (or other HTTP-capable client software, such as that used on mobile phones, etc.) that the client uses to make the request. Depending on the browser and platform, this string may also identify the operating system the client uses, as well as the version of the installed . NET Framework (IE only).

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the User-Agent string.

Example

The example writes the UserAgent property to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim stringvar As String
   stringvar = Request.UserAgent
   Message.Text = "User Agent: " & stringvar
End Sub

Notes

When you attempt to discern the capabilities of the client browser, using the properties of the HttpBrowserCapabilities object returned by the Request.Browser property is generally easier. However, there may be cases in which the User-Agent for a given client returns information that is not checked for by the HttpBrowserCapabilities class. In this case, you could add the desired information to the <browserCaps> configuration section handler in machine.config (see Chapters 8 and 20 for more information on ASP.NET configuration) and then create your own version of the HttpBrowserCapabilities class by inheriting from the built-in class and adding your own property or properties for the User-Agent attribute you're looking for. Or, if you don't want to make that effort, you could simply parse the User-Agent string for the desired attribute by using the UserAgent property.

UserHostAddress

stringvar = Request.UserHostAddress

Returns the IP address of the client making the request.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the client IP address.

Example

The example writes the UserHostAddress, UserHostName, and UserLanguages properties to the browser:

Sub Page_Load( )
   Dim HostAddress, HostName, Languages( ) As String
   Dim iCounter As Integer
  
   HostAddress = Request.UserHostAddress
   HostName = Request.UserHostName
   Languages = Request.UserLanguages
  
   Message.Text = "Client IP Address: " & HostAddress & "<br/>"
   Message.Text &= "Client Machine Name: " & HostName & "<br/>"
   For iCounter = 0 To Languages.GetUpperBound(0)
      Message.Text &= "Client Language " & iCounter & ": " & _ 
         CStr(Languages(iCounter)) & "<br/>" 
   Next iCounter
End Sub
UserHostName

stringvar = Request.UserHostName

Returns a string that contains the DNS hostname of the client making the request.

Parameter

stringvar

A string variable to receive the hostname.

Example

See the example for the UserHostAddress property.

Notes

If no DNS server is available that can resolve the client IP address to a DNS name, the UserHostName property returns the IP address of the client (just like the UserHostAddress property).

UserLanguages

stringArray = Request.UserLanguages

Returns a sorted string array containing the list of languages supported by the client.

Parameter

stringArray

A string array variable to receive the list of client-supported languages.

Example

See the example for the UserHostAddress property.

Notes

To test this property, you can set support for additional languages in your browser as follows:

  • In Internet Explorer 6, select Internet Options... from the Tools menu. On the General tab of the Internet Options dialog, click the Languages... button. Use the Language Preference dialog to add, remove, or move languages up or down on the list of preferred languages.

  • In Netscape Navigator 6, select Preferences... from the Edit menu and then select the Languages node in the lefthand tree view. Use the options on the right to add, remove, or move languages up or down on the list.

Now if you browse a page containing the code in the UserHostAddress example, all languages you select will be listed in the order you chose.

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